About Myers Park Baptist

You hear the word “Baptist,” and maybe you think: 
I know all about Baptists.

Maybe you, or people you know, grew up in this denomination. Perhaps your idea of what it means to be a Baptist comes from the news media or movies. We hope you’ll come to us with an open mind. We are Myers Park Baptist, an ecumenical church in the Baptist tradition, and we are different.

A free pulpit means the freedom to question.

Myers Park Baptist Church was founded in 1943 by a visionary group of families that shared a dream: to build a church that welcomed all, embodied Christ’s teachings, and reflected the spirit of religious freedom rooted in the Baptist tradition. They also envisioned a place where people would have the right to interpret scripture for themselves, and where congregants could serve as priests to one another.

The cornerstones of our ministry have always been a free pulpit, thoughtful education, an extensive local and national outreach ministry, and worship that is beautiful and draws upon the historic traditions of the church.

“We are a people on a journey of faith, with a variety of opinions and aspirations. No matter how diverse we are, there are threads that hold us together. We’re all seeking relationship with God, knowing that there are more questions than answers. We accept, respect and celebrate our differences.”

Skip Gribble, church member


For more than 70 years, we’ve built a reputation as a place where members are encouraged to ask questions, debate issues, and seek truth. Our doors are open to all who wish to follow Jesus on a journey of faith. As a result, today we are a vibrant ecumenical congregation, comprised of people from more than 20 different faith communities. We have 2,196 members on our rolls, including about 1,200 active members living in the Charlotte area. 

Our openness to new ideas is expressed in many ways, none more important than our free pulpit. In the words of our first senior minister, Dr. George Heaton, “A free pulpit is the very essence of religious and political democracy. . . . A free pulpit means encouragement to break new trails in thought and action; a free pulpit is a great bulwark against tyranny.”

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